For Your Consideration

“And the nominees for Best Family History Post are….” In keeping with the ending writer’s strike and the fact that the Academy Awards show must (and will) go on, the current call for entries for the Carnival of Genealogy is on the theme of Awards for Family History/Genealogy posts for 2007 (and the first 6 weeks of 2008). I’ve culled though my site archives, called in favors from dress designers and stylists, and am ready to walk the red carpet. Here, for your consideration, are nominees for awards of outstanding achievement in Family History and Genealogy weblog posting.

The Red Carpet. I’ve walked a red carpet once. No lie. The event was a US Premiere of a film for AFI Film festival. It was held (wait for it) in Beverly Hills at AMPAS, the American Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The Oscars place. On the sidewalk outside, there it was: red carpet. And velvet ropes along either side. I saw them, and gulped. My friend urged me hold my head up high,  smile, and walk with confidence.  I did. The paparazzi ignored us plebes, though. I also had a brush with a red carpet and awards ceremony almost exactly a year ago. A high-school friend was nominated for a Grammy, so I accompanied her to the Grammy Special Awards and Reception. Roped off red carpet was on that sidewalk, too. I didn’t walk down it, though. It was for those who arrived by limo. I drove myself there and parked in the lot across the street. So prosaic.

But this red carpet for these awards is very special. It’ll last hundreds of years.

What will I wear to the awards? What sort of family history digitality longevity fashion statement can I make as I walk on the acid-free PH-balanced red carpet for this award show?  I’ve pitched this idea to my dress designer team: an outfit where the top is constructed from a shiny fringe constructed out of short bits of magnetic tape. Not any tapes I’ve recorded, mind you, but blank tape. And a full, A-line skirt that is not sequinned so much as constructed from optical media disks, bottom-sides facing out. The CD-skirt has stripes of gold disks, silver disks, and cyan disks. Very picturesque, with reflective rainbow beams that are perfect—the camera will love love love this dress. The sound of the skirt? Not so much. The swish is interrupted by too much clatter, but it’s so! perfect! for the theme. Oh, and my handbag will be a small clutch made from knitted cassette tape. I’ll wear a pair of sensible white cotton gloves—to keep my fingerprints from getting on anything. I’ll dress up that prosaic white cotton with some lace trim. Oh, and of course some heirloom jewelry. The agate heart necklace made from the stone my grandmother found on a road trip. One of the cool hats that came from the collection of my other grandmother’s hats. People, this fashion combination is downright scary. But what with the economic downturn because of the writers strike, the fashionistas are taking my calls; I think they’ll even humor me! I have a backup plan—important, now that the Hollywood Glitterati are preparing for the actual awards. My second choice of outfit is a stylish dress constructed from duct tape.

And the Nominees are….

Best Picture —I think that as a category of photos, I’d like to nominate the set of Library of Congress/National Archive photos that I used to accompany the Family Stories of Wartime.

Best ScreenplayWhy International Women’s Day is Hard. Genre: Drama. Nonfiction. It’s a tragic story, compelling, and I have no idea at all who I’d have to play the parts. I’ll have to take a few meetings before we come up with a cast list.

Best Documentary
—Narrowing this down to a single entry is hard. You know how an actor will get nominated in two different categories (this year, Cate Blanchette for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress) and so receive neither award? I think that might happen with nominees for the documentary award. Here’s my shortlist:

The just-posted StoryCorps Adventure, which documents what happened when my brother and I interviewed our parents in the StoryCorps booth.

Or there could be the How I bought my recording kit. A long piece in which I document all the decisions and technical mumbo jumbo I waded through in order to put together my portable recording kit. Incidentally, I showed the kit to someone who deserves a lifetime achievement for Best Sound Design—Doug Kaye, of IT Conversations and other Podcasterama pursuits, and he said that my kit was the highlight of the things he saw at Podcast/Portable Media Expo. He likes me! He really likes me!

A runner up: Letters in the Attic - not digital but analog. How I’m processing the letters from the attic.

And finally, a perpetual work in progress, my Equipment Guide’s From Spoken Word to Digital Audio  Flash infographic that shows different methods by which audio can go from recorder to computer to disc. Hmmm. maybe I should nominate that for best picture.


Best Biography: A family story about, well, a digital tool This is a nominee that I share with my father, as the words are his.

imageBest Comedy: Ancestry.com scrapes websites. Parody screenshot of the Ancestry.com website. Come on, I know you laughed when you saw it. Admit it. It’s a screenshot that goes up to 11.

I’d hate to think of what the Geneablogger Razzies would look like. My Award show outfit might fit the bill for a razzie.

So, now the camera is focused on me and five other nominees while the well-dressed presenters say, “… and the winner is….” There’s one last puzzling thing, though.

Who is in the Academy?

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Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on February 10, 2008 in • General
2 CommentsPermalink

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Comments

LOL. The awards show will be worth it just to see your outfit!

I remember reading the story about your grandparents. It is one of those stories I’m thankful I don’t have to write.

Apple  on 02/11  at  03:48 AM

Hi, Susan

LOVED your site parody ... and your outfit!

Schelly

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