Internet offers high-tech way to record history

Ventura County Star article points to resources on the internet for recording (and recorded) history.

The article about online resources for recording history, and the boom in historical resources now appearing on the internet. (reg required, but try bugmetnot reg)

Some sites mentioned in the article (all look very interesting)

http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Humanities/History/Oral_History

http://www.soundportraits.org/

http://www.iwitnesstohistory.org/

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on March 21, 2005 in • LinksOnline Oral History Collections
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Edirol R1 looks good

A reader in a forum gives a full report on the (new) Edirol R1 after it finally arrived and he had an opportunity to test it.

The post in the CNet MP3 Discussion thread by a person called Criggs. The

My personal need was a high-quality portable recorder that could record non-stop on one set of batteries in full bandwidth for 3 hours, on a storage medium that could hold a minimum of 6 hours. The short story is that, after extensive tinkering and experimentation this past weekend, I can report to you that this device can indeed do that, and as such gives promise of being an EXTREMELY POWERFUL, UNIQUE product.

Non-stop recording for 3 hours: It will handle an interview on a single set of batteries all right.

 

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on March 16, 2005 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Listening ear

The State, South Carolina (03/15/2005) Collecting Oral Histories

The most effective tool in collecting an oral history, besides a working tape recorder, is a listening ear, according to Converse College history professor Melissa Walker.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on March 15, 2005 in • Do it: YourselfInterviewing
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Transom Tools: SHOUT OUT - A Kid’s Guide to Recording Stories

This page on Transom.org is a guide (for kids) on how to collect stories. It’s offered as a downloadable PDF, too.

Collecting stories is easier than you think. Find a park bench or front porch. Invite your grandmother, your friend, or coach to join you. And listen.

That’s the key. In the listening, you will hear stories that people often keep to themselves - that we don’t slow down enough to hear. These stories can be truer and more important than many things we hear on radio, see on TV or read in the newspaper.

This booklet will help you gather those stories. It is an introduction to spoken history.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on March 14, 2005 in • Do it: YourselfInterviewing
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Saginaw MI Oral History Project continues without grant

Saginaw, MI: Oral History project continues w/o grant. Lives of minority residents who helped build the city.

Saginaw News (Mlive) story.

It’s a long haul to get everything completed. Whaddaya do when the grant money runs out? Continue on, at a much slower pace.

...A Saginaw native delved inside the lives of minority residents who helped build the city.

Michelle S. Johnson, a former professor at Saginaw Valley State University, Michigan State University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, interviewed 35 black and Hispanic residents beginning in 1999.

The result is the Saginaw Oral History Project, which Johnson hopes offers a peek into the religious, economic and cultural impact minorities had on their hometown.
...

When the grant expired two years ago, Johnson said, she still ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on February 25, 2005 in • Oral history in the newsOral History Projects
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Reception honoring Louisiana OH participants

Baton Rouge, LA: Felicianas’ black history. Interviewees aged 64 to 104.

Baton Rouge: 2theadvocate.com

Travis Carter, Louis Emery, William Gilmore Sr., Alice Johnson, Elizabeth Lee, Geraldine London, Violet Pate, Turlie Richardson, Sallie Smith, Sallie Whitfield-Mackie and Louise Williams—ages 64 to 104—were interviewed in 2004 by folklorists and volunteers with the West Feliciana African American Heritage Task Force.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • Oral history in the news
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These books have gone Hollywood

The Other Hollywood (porn industry) in an oral history

Star Tribune on Hollywood books, including this one:

“The Other Hollywood: The Uncensored Oral History of the Porn Film Industry,” by Legs McNeil and Jennifer Osborne with Peter Pavia (ReganBooks, 620 pages, $27.95).

If people have done something, there can be an oral history about it.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • Oral history in the news
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Grant for Save Our History awarded

NJ.com: Save our History Grant awarded

MILLVILLE—The History Channel has announced the award of a “Save Our History” grant to the Millville Army Air Field Museum and Millville Memorial High School to partner in an oral history project.

The project would preserve the community’s and museum’s important role in preserving the history of the air field as a training facility for pilots about to go overseas for the European Theater during World War II.

The MAAFM was one of only 29 organizations out of about 700 who applied to be awarded a grant to fund innovative educational projects designed to being communities and children together to preserve their local history.

Students conduct the interviews.
Results will be part of ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on February 24, 2005 in • Oral history in the newsOral History Projects
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The Amazing Slow Downer

From Roni Music comes software to slow down (or speed up) music without changing pitch. Windows and Mac. $44.95. Designed to slow down music so other musicians can figure out that cool guitar lick (or whatever), this may be helpful to slow down speech for transcription.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on February 11, 2005 in • AudioAudio: Software
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Edirol UA-1D USB Digital Audio Capture Interface

USB Digital Audio Capture . Cross Platform (Win 98/Me/@000/XP and MacOS X). “The UA-1D is the simplest way to add S/Pdif connections to your computer. S/Pdif (Sony/Philips Digital Interface) is a standard audio transfer file format.”

 

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Digital Recording: Here to Stay.

A discussion of digital recording issues posted at the Tape transcription Center (of Boston).

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on February 10, 2005 in • Digitality
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Museum of Sound

BoingBoing posts on an LA Times article about the Museum of Sound

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on January 12, 2005 in • Audio
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Talking Across the Lines—- Worldwide Conversations

Talking Across the Lines: Oral tradition and folk tradition from Appalaicha. Workshops, too.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on December 01, 2004 in • Links
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Center for History and New Media

Center for History and New Media
Site description:

Since 1994, the Center for History and New Media has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history�to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past. We sponsor more than a dozen digital history projects and offer free tools and resources for historians.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • Links
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Audio Field Recording Equipment Guide

Put together by the Vermont Folklife Center, in Middlebury VT, this Audio Field Recording Equipment Guide is described, “This document is designed to offer guidance to researchers interested in obtaining audio recording equipment for conducting folklore, ethnomusicology and oral history fieldwork projects.”

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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