Audio: Hardware

Hardware for recording, transferring, or playing back sound

Edirol R1 looks good

A reader in a forum gives a full report on the (new) Edirol R1 after it finally arrived and he had an opportunity to test it.

The post in the CNet MP3 Discussion thread by a person called Criggs. The

My personal need was a high-quality portable recorder that could record non-stop on one set of batteries in full bandwidth for 3 hours, on a storage medium that could hold a minimum of 6 hours. The short story is that, after extensive tinkering and experimentation this past weekend, I can report to you that this device can indeed do that, and as such gives promise of being an EXTREMELY POWERFUL, UNIQUE product.

Non-stop recording for 3 hours: It will handle an interview on a single set of batteries all right.

 

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on March 16, 2005 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Edirol UA-1D USB Digital Audio Capture Interface

USB Digital Audio Capture . Cross Platform (Win 98/Me/@000/XP and MacOS X). “The UA-1D is the simplest way to add S/Pdif connections to your computer. S/Pdif (Sony/Philips Digital Interface) is a standard audio transfer file format.”

 

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on February 11, 2005 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Audio Field Recording Equipment Guide

Put together by the Vermont Folklife Center, in Middlebury VT, this Audio Field Recording Equipment Guide is described, “This document is designed to offer guidance to researchers interested in obtaining audio recording equipment for conducting folklore, ethnomusicology and oral history fieldwork projects.”

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on December 01, 2004 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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SanDisk flashes new digital audio devices

Tech News on ZDNet:
SanDisk is releasing its first line of digital audio players to help expand use of its key product, flash memory.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on October 12, 2004 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Transom Tools: MiniDisc Guide

Transom, a “showcase and workshop for new public radio” has a Minidisc Guide describing the pros and cons of minidisc (for radio professionals, who also use cassette, DAT, and digital recorders), and describes essentials of what to buy and what to use.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on September 27, 2004 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Media Supply: Archiving, Paper Labels and Sharpies

Media Supply’s Archiving Advice

Our company has been in the CD-R business for years and we have worked with lots of clients who use discs for archiving. Here are some tips we recommend to clients….

1. Anytime you plan on long time storage, don’t use paper labels. [...]

2. Try to go with a true gold disc if you want to seriously archive. A gold reflective layer disc with Phthalocyanine dye has a shelf life of almost 300 years, compared to under 100 for a silver Phthalocyanine dye disc, and less than 30 for a Cyanine discs. Basically the metal in the silver disc can oxidize, and the gold doesn’t, so no breakdown of the refective layer. Watch out for some gold discs that are just a gold screen print on the surface. MAM-A and Hi-Space both use real gold reflective layers. If you can’t go gold, at least go with a silver Phthalocyanine disc.

3. In general avoid writing on discs ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on August 29, 2004 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Different tape recording speeds

Tape Speeds for different formats as measured in inches per second, or centimeters per second. Tape formats range from reel-to-reel to cassettes.

Cassettes go the slowest of the bunch, at 1-7/8 inches/second. Microcasettes aren’t mentioned here (but are in this 1983 microcassette review), but they go half the speed of cassettes, at 15/16 inches per second, or even slower: 1/2 inch per second.)

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on August 16, 2004 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Media College: Vocal Microphones

Info about Vocal Microphones, the best kind of microphones to use in interview situations.

Note: there’s Lots at the Media College  site to get a backgrounder on audio, microphones  and so forth.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on August 05, 2004 in • Audio: Hardware
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Turn your iPod into a digital recording device

Record oral history conversations using Griffin Technology’s iTalk, which turns your iPod into a Voice Recorder.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on April 23, 2004 in • Audio: Hardware
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