Genealogy

The art of research into family history through records and artifacts. Includes Carnival of Genealogy, too.

SoCal Genealogical Jamboree this weekend

image I’ll be in Burbank at the Burbank Airport Hilton Marriott later today and all weekend, representin’ this site and showing off equipment for making recordings. Should be lots of fun. Oh, and I got a wonderful audio-equipment-related birthday present yesterday. So retro. So cool.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on June 08, 2007 in • Genealogy
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War Records

On yesterday’s Morning Edition, NPR described how Ancestry.com opened up a new section of war records. Dating back to the 1600s . Cost to digitize: in the millions. Free access from a few days ago till D-Day anniversary, June 6. (after that, pay) Use this as an opportunity to do some research. Then interview living family about their memories of the people and events whose records you found.

This can be addicting. I found my grandfather’s WW1 draft card. smile

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on May 26, 2007 in • GenealogyPersonal History
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An Old School Mystery

It’s amazing what you find when you search the web. One day I happened to go poking around through the old, old, archives of MIT’s school newspaper. My grandmother graduated from there in 1920. A while back they scanned old copies of the paper and uploaded pdfs and text that was generated from an auto-OCR process. Yes, I found my grandmother in the pages of the paper. In fact, she worked on the paper, so her name is on the masthead/credits. One story, though, surprised me. I hadn’t heard anything about the events described in it from any family member. I found out about a significant traumatic event my grandmother went through… by searching on the web.

The Tech, the MIT newspaper, ran a front page story in its issue of April 2, 1919.

This is the first story:

image

MISS FOGLER ‘20 AND DEYETTE ‘20 INJURED

Electrochemists Are Victims of Automobile Accident in Governor Square Last Sunday Evening

DEYETTE’S CONDITION CRITICAL


As a result of an automobile accident in Governor Square last Sunday evening, two Technology students, Joseph Coleman Deyette ‘20 of Portland, Ore-,gon, and -Miss Florence Fo-ler ‘20 of Billings. Montana. are now in the Commonwealth Avenue Hospital in a serious condition. The accident occurred as, the couple, returning home from Boston, were crossing Commonwealth avenue in front of the Hotel Buckminster. An ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on May 02, 2007 in • GenealogyPersonal History
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22nd Carnival of Genealogy

The carnival is UP!. The theme was Carousel. Or free for all. I liked that. Also found out through Miriam’s Ancestoris “What I’m reading these days” is that this very site is featured in the latest issue of Internet Genealogy. Cool.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on April 17, 2007 in • GenealogyHousekeeping
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Scanfest

I had composed a huge post talking all about scanfest. Then, just as I neared the completion of it, Firefox crashed, taking my words and thoughts with it. So, while the black cartoon scribble above my head dissipates, I’ll just say this: it was fun, let’s do it again. Voice chat via Gizmo Project was fun. I liked it. It was distracting (I wasn’t the only distracted one), let’s have more just-social chats to get the “get to know you” out of our systems so we can do scanning, file naming and chatting simultaneously. I scanned two letters (one involved 14 separate files). It’s a start.

It was good to “meet” Miriam, Denise, Lee, Jasia, Amy, and Apple. I hope I didn’t miss anyone. Like I said, it was distracting (especially as I was copying and pasting from one IM to another, and then talking up chat topics to the voice-over-IP chat, and typing the Voice synopsis to the typed group IM chat… all while trying to dream up file naming conventions for the letters I was scanning.)

(and I’m going to change the defaults of this software to save draft posts and then publish them. That is just too arrgh-y to repeat)

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on March 26, 2007 in • GenealogyPhotographs
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Carnival of Genealogy #20: A Tribute to Women

Carnival of Genealogy is up. I’ve been making my way through all the entries as genealogy bloggers remember women in their lives. Great stories and remembrances of women– many grandmothers. It’s SO worth a visit. Since my entry was (probably) the biggest downer of the group, I’m happy to see that the theme for next time around is more in keeping with the goofiness of April Fool’s Day. Deadline is, of course, April 1.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on March 19, 2007 in • GenealogyPersonal History
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The Memories of Others

are the memories of ourselves. A wise, reflective post by Merge Divide. He touches on the importance of hearing stories from your forbears.

I’ll give you a little taste of the post. Really, just go there and read the whole thing.

My dining companions and I discussed the lives of our forebears. Even though I know both of them extremely well, I discovered that there are formative experiences from their lives that I am largely oblivious of. Much of their own personal stories have been influenced by interactions with people who are long gone.

Have you ever sat down and talked about the people from which you descend? Genealogical research seems to have become immensely popular over the last generation, due to the radical improvements in information technology. [...] But while a genealogy can be intriguing with its ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on January 04, 2007 in • GenealogyPersonal History
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Carnival of Genealogy, Episode 15

A Blogger’s Dozen lists of plans for 2007 or reflections on 2006. My overly optimistic list is included among the group. Hey, I’ll be happy if I get some of that stuff done. I consider it an ongoing To-Do list, publicly stated confessed.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on January 03, 2007 in • GenealogyLinks
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Genealogy as Graffiti

Thought provoking: Genealogical Graffiti and the Personalization of History, on the blog Drawing Parallels, written by a student of public history named Kris. It’s a surprising meditation on the nature of graffiti (art done outside the “mainstream” and outside “established channels”) and genealogy, which is, I guess, looked at askance by public historians.

When I asked a few friends where they saw history in their everyday lives, most responded with the same answers: Museums, monuments, old buildings, television. When I asked these same questions to family, I received another answer that has come up several times in Donald Spanner’s Archives class – Genealogy.

To me, genealogy seems like a natural corollary of social history. At its outset, social history sought to tell the historical narrative of those who had not previously been included. Genealogy seems much the same, as family members seek to understand their own history. In less than one hundred years, we have gone from a bottom-down approach of history, to a bottom-up one, and ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on December 29, 2006 in • GenealogyHistoryPersonal History
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Genealogy Carnival #12: Solving Technical Problems while doing Family History

Technical problems and family history. A favorite topic of mine, seeing as how my life is mired in often consumed by solving technical problems. Indeed that’s what this site is all about.

This edition’s entries include: magnetic tape and cinching; putting grandpa’s travel album online; research, kludgy sites and frustration; why one writes software; liberating photo albums of physical space; family geek fun; how to organize digitized family letters, how to use VoIP to record family research phone calls, finding family history videos on the net, and transparent technology in telling tales of Mom.

It’s a cinch. This is not the cinch you are looking for

Richard Hess keeps a blog called Restoration Tips and Notes; he’s a man with a collection of dang near every reel-to-reel tape recorder head ever made. And he buys special cassette players on eBay. Just because. He’s involved in the business of restoration, which means he doesn’t transform the tape itself, but works to restore and capture the sound on that tape. He works with tape recordings of all sorts and

magically

skillfully coaxes old tape to play. He then transfers it to a digital format. Maybe he cleans it up, maybe he does a straight transfer. He’s witnessed ugly and hopeless spools of tape. His post, Let sleeping tapes ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on November 19, 2006 in • GenealogyLinks
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Carnival of Genealogy: Solving Technical Problems: Call for entries!!!!

Submit entries here. Deadline: November 15, 10pm Pacific.

Theme: Solving technical problems while working on your family history.

Have you encountered a technical problem while working on your family history? Did you solve it? Then let’s hear the problem and your solution. Haven’t found a solution? Describe the problem and how it affects you (who knows, you might find a solution as a result). You know that all software and hardware works perfectly. (cough, cough). It never breaks. All components work well with one another. Upgrades always go smoothly. (yeah right sure). So come one, come all. Feel free to gripe. Or to boast of your prowess. Or anything in between. Just as long as it’s about solving technical problems while working on your family history.

The carnival will be posted here by November 19th.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on November 10, 2006 in • Do it: YourselfGenealogy
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Carnival of Genealogy, 11th edition

This version, Making the Most of Family Get-Togethers, is hosted at genealogy.about.com. The Carnival is roving this month, and the next carnival will be here!!!

Next topic: Have you encountered a technical problem while working on your family history? Did you solve it? Then let’s hear the problem and your solution. Haven’t found a solution? Describe what it is, and how it affects you (who knows, you might find a solution as a result). You know that all software and hardware works perfectly. (cough, cough). It never breaks. All components work well with one another. Uprades always go smoothly. (yeah right sure). So come one, come all. Feel free to gripe. Or to boast of your prowess. Or anything in between. Just as long as it’s about solving technical problems while working on your family history.

Submit your blog post by 15 November here

...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on November 07, 2006 in • GenealogyLinks
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