Media Supply: Archiving, Paper Labels and Sharpies

Media Supply’s Archiving Advice

Our company has been in the CD-R business for years and we have worked with lots of clients who use discs for archiving. Here are some tips we recommend to clients….

1. Anytime you plan on long time storage, don’t use paper labels. [...]

2. Try to go with a true gold disc if you want to seriously archive. A gold reflective layer disc with Phthalocyanine dye has a shelf life of almost 300 years, compared to under 100 for a silver Phthalocyanine dye disc, and less than 30 for a Cyanine discs. Basically the metal in the silver disc can oxidize, and the gold doesn’t, so no breakdown of the refective layer. Watch out for some gold discs that are just a gold screen print on the surface. MAM-A and Hi-Space both use real gold reflective layers. If you can’t go gold, at least go with a silver Phthalocyanine disc.

3. In general avoid writing on discs ...Read More

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on August 29, 2004 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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CD Media World - CD-R Quality

CD MEDIA WORLD: Comparison of quality of CD-R media.
Imation, Kodak, Philips (gold) TraxData (Gold), Philips Silver, Rixoh Premium, Sony, TDK. All good.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • Longevity
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Different tape recording speeds

Tape Speeds for different formats as measured in inches per second, or centimeters per second. Tape formats range from reel-to-reel to cassettes.

Cassettes go the slowest of the bunch, at 1-7/8 inches/second. Microcasettes aren’t mentioned here (but are in this 1983 microcassette review), but they go half the speed of cassettes, at 15/16 inches per second, or even slower: 1/2 inch per second.)

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on August 16, 2004 in • AudioAudio: Hardware
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Onionworks

Onionworks.org – “Owned and operated by Robert D. Smith, a journalist and writer with 25 years of experience eliciting life stories from individuals and families in
communities and people in the corporate world.”

Onionworks puts into print the stories and legacies of your family members. We can customize this offering into any media form you wish: oral (audio cassette or CD); written (manuscript or published book); or visual (video on VHS tape or DVD).

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on August 10, 2004 in • Oral History Services
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Oplanet TV

OPlanetTV TV documentarians to tell YOUR story.

We are a team of seasoned TV documentarians led by Jean-Philippe Touzeau who believe in the simple values of visual and oral communication. Strong from our experiences in interviews we want to give access to anyone who wants to have a professional recording of their stories. We know that everyone has a story to tell and we provide the latest in technology to make sure that story will be accessible for generations to come.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • Oral History Services
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Timepieces Personal Biographies

Timepiecesbios.com – To help get your biography written down to pass on to future generations.

Offering our professional services as interviewers, writers, and book designers, we will produce a book of your life story (or the life story of someone you love) to share with family and friends. Complete with stories and pictures from all stages of your life, your personal biography will ensure that your memories last longer than a lifetime.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • Oral History Services
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Association of Personal Historians

Personal Historians.org  “Producing life story legacies through books, oral histories or videos - with thoughts, feelings and memories - enriches lives for generations to come, including your own.” For Pros and Hobbyists.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on in • Oral History Services
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Media College: Vocal Microphones

Info about Vocal Microphones, the best kind of microphones to use in interview situations.

Note: there’s Lots at the Media College  site to get a backgrounder on audio, microphones  and so forth.

Posted by Susan A. Kitchens on August 05, 2004 in • Audio: Hardware
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